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Member-based center offers community and growth

Miracle Clubhouse

The award-winning, nationally certified GESMV Miracle Clubhouse provides its members with a work-ordered day, along with partnership, community, and laughter.

Miracle Clubhouse

The Goodwill Easter Seals Miami Valley Miracle Clubhouse is a vital community for growth, hope and opportunity for people recovering from mental illness in the Dayton-area. The Clubhouse is committed to ongoing improvement, positive development of strengths and elimination of the stigma against those with mental illness.

A Partner on Your Personal Journey

At the heart of the Miracle Clubhouse is the belief that every member can sufficiently recover from the effects of mental illness to lead a personally satisfying and productive life. Together, members and staff participate in activities that provide a solid foundation for growth, self-respect and individual accomplishment. Decision making and governance involves members and staff working together to develop Clubhouse plans and policies.

Our Origins and a Growing Movement

Clubhouses are member-based communities where people living with persistent mental illness come to rebuild their lives. From the movement’s origins in 1948, Clubhouses in more than 300 communities across 28 countries have provided their members with this proven approach to rehabilitation, recovery and re-integration into the community.

In 2016, Miracle Clubhouse received international accreditation by Clubhouse International. At the time, it was only the 166th club worldwide to receive this honor.

Results Through Work and Community

According to Clubhouse International, the Clubhouse experience has been proven to result in positive outcomes for many members, including:

  • Employment, with longer on-the-job tenure for members engaging in Clubhouse Transitional Employment. 1
  • Cost effective, compared to other mental healthcare approaches. The cost of Clubhouses estimated to be one-third of the cost of the IPS model; about half the annual costs of Community Mental Health Centers; and substantially less than the ACT model. 2
  • A significant decrease in hospitalizations as a result of membership in a Clubhouse program. 3
  • Reduced incarcerations, with criminal justice system involvement substantially diminished during and after Clubhouse psychosocial program membership. 4
  • Improved well-being compared with individuals receiving psychiatric services without Clubhouse membership. Clubhouse members were significantly more likely to report that they had close friendships and someone they could rely on when they needed help. 5
  • Better physical and mental health. A recent study suggests that service systems like Clubhouses that offer ongoing social supports enhance mental and physical health by reducing disconnectedness. 6

 

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Sources: 1 Macias, Kinney and Rodican (1995). 2 McKay, Yates, and Johnsen (2005); IPS model reported by Clark et al (1998); ACT model reported by Macias et al (2001). 3 De Masso, Avi-Itzak and Obler (2001).. 4 Johnson and Hickey (1999). 5 Warner, Huxley and Berg (1999). 6 Leff and colleagues (2004).